Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake Tribe Files Motion to Transfer CFPB Lawsuit from Northern District of Illinois to Kansas

Tribe Intends to Seek Immediate Transfer of Groundless Lawsuit

Overland Park, Kansas: Today the lending entities of the Habematolel Pomo of the Upper Lake Tribe (HPUL), filed a motion to transfer the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s groundless lawsuit from the federal district court in Chicago, Illinois to the federal district court in Kansas City.

The CFPB’s own complaint alleges hardly any ties to Illinois. The Tribe’s lending portfolios have no employees in Illinois, nor do they conduct significant operations in Illinois. By contrast, the CFPB’s own complaint repeatedly mentions the lending entities’ ties to Kansas. While the HPUL direct and control their businesses from reservation land, many administrative functions, such as advertising and customer service, are supported by employees of a Tribally owned Call Center in Kansas, which has over 100 employees in Kansas City.

Many of those employees have knowledge of issues central to the Tribe’s defense against the CFPB’s meritless lawsuit, and those employees would face the undue burden of being forced to travel over 500 miles to Illinois simply to satisfy the CFPB’s choice of venue.

Lori Alvino McGill, attorney for the HPUL says;

“The CFPB thinks that it can sue anyone, anywhere, without regard to the inconvenience and burdens it places upon the businesses and people affected by the agency’s unlawful actions. The Tribe is fully committed to vigorously defending itself and its legitimate businesses against the CFPB’s baseless lawsuit. Today’s filing was just the first step in that fight.”

Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake Tribe Files Motion to Transfer CFPB Lawsuit from Northern District of Illinois to Kansas

Tribe Intends to Seek Immediate Transfer of Groundless Lawsuit

Overland Park, Kansas: Today the lending entities of the Habematolel Pomo of the Upper Lake Tribe (HPUL), filed a motion to transfer the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s groundless lawsuit from the federal district court in Chicago, Illinois to the federal district court in Kansas City.

The CFPB’s own complaint alleges hardly any ties to Illinois. The Tribe’s lending portfolios have no employees in Illinois, nor do they conduct significant operations in Illinois. By contrast, the CFPB’s own complaint repeatedly mentions the lending entities’ ties to Kansas. While the HPUL direct and control their businesses from reservation land, many administrative functions, such as advertising and customer service, are supported by employees of a Tribally owned Call Center in Kansas, which has over 100 employees in Kansas City.

Many of those employees have knowledge of issues central to the Tribe’s defense against the CFPB’s meritless lawsuit, and those employees would face the undue burden of being forced to travel over 500 miles to Illinois simply to satisfy the CFPB’s choice of venue.

Lori Alvino McGill, attorney for the HPUL says;

“The CFPB thinks that it can sue anyone, anywhere, without regard to the inconvenience and burdens it places upon the businesses and people affected by the agency’s unlawful actions. The Tribe is fully committed to vigorously defending itself and its legitimate businesses against the CFPB’s baseless lawsuit. Today’s filing was just the first step in that fight.”